China’s Communist party isn’t really afraid of the internet

china internet

Earlier this week, a Chinese propaganda official said China’s internet-based “new media” were threatening the Communist party. Using one of Mao Zedong’s most famous phrases, Ren Xianliang, vice-minister of propaganda in Shaanxi province, wrote in an editorial (link in Chinese): “Just as political power grows out of the barrel of a gun, the Party’s control of the media is an unassailable basis of the party’s leadership.”

More at the QUARTZ.

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China jails man for Cultural Revolution murder

The Cultural Revolution radicalised young Chinese into acts of violence against "elites".

The Cultural Revolution radicalised young Chinese into acts of violence against “elites”.

A court in China has jailed an elderly man for a murder committed during the Cultural Revolution after a trial which sparked fierce debate.

Qiu Riren, who is thought to be in his 80s, was sentenced to three and a half years in prison, officials said.

More at BBC News CHINA.

Chinese propaganda theme park

(via vice)

(via vice)

Splendid China – a place that might have been Mao’s nationalistic vision of Disneyland. The park’s stated mission is to condense “the Chinese history, culture, places of interest, folk arts, and customs” into one easily accessible destination in Shenzhen, about an hour from Hong Kong. And that includes little areas set out for the western provinces.

More at the Vice here.

China’s growing appetite for a different luxury goods: illegal drugs

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John Lee, head of Customs Drug Investigation Bureau, speaks in front of packs of cocaine seized in Hong Kong on July 6, 2012. (Bobby Yip/Reuters)

An exponential curve seems to describe most things in modern China — cars, housing, Louis Vuitton handbags, ice cream, iPads. It also describes the growth of drug use and addicts. Only 25 years ago, narcotics and illicit drug use were nearly unheard of.

For the rest of the story, click here

Opposition to labor camps in China

Liu Jie, 60, said she was beaten and hogtied to a chair during the two years she was confined at a forced-labor camp.

Liu Jie, 60, said she was beaten and hogtied to a chair during the two years she was confined at a forced-labor camp. (via The New York Times)

Last year Mr. Ren was among tens of thousands of Chinese who were dumped into the nation’s vast “re-education through labor” system, a Stalinist-inspired constellation of penal colonies where  social irritants toil in dismal conditions for up to four years, all without trial. With as many as 190,000 inmates at any one time, it is one of the world’s largest systems of forced labor.

More at The New York Times here.